Sunday, Andy and I decided to go check out the War Memorial of Korea and museum. It was raining of course, but we figured that since a majority of everything was inside it would be fine.  We weren’t planning on spending more than a couple of hours there but actually ended up spending the whole day pretty much because there was just so much to look at and see and do.

Outside there are a lot of memorials that represent different things.

This represented the sword and the tree of life…I totally thought it was two sides of a bullet buuuut I was wrong. It was really cool to see.

These face ball fountain pieces did not have any explanation in English.  It was kind of strange though to see all these little faces on several of these throughout the court yard area.

This is a replica of a monument built for a great king.  Sadly, the original stands in China on what was once part of Korea during a heightened and stronger period, but now is Chinese territory.

This was a really awesome piece to see and read about.  The English text explaining the monument called the Statue of Brothers says this:

“The Statue of Brothers is an 18 meter wide and 11-meter high symbol of the Korean War. It consists of the upper part, lower part and inner part. The upper part of the statue depicts a scene where a family’s older brother, an ROK officer, and his younger brother, a North Korean soldier, meet in a battlefield and express reconciliation, love, and forgiveness. The lower tomb-shaped dome was built with pieces of granite collected from nationwide locations symbolizing the sacrifices made by our patriots. The crack in the dome stands for the division of Korea and the hope for reunification. Objects inside the dome include a mosaic wall painting that expresses the spirit of the Korean people to overcome the national tragedy and a map plate of the 16 UN Allied Nations that dispatched troops to the war. The links of iron chain on the ceiling signify the unbreakable bonds of a unified Korea.”

Bronze statues like these that represent all types of people on both sides that were, and still are, effected by the war between North and South Korea.  They were big and detailed and to me that made them powerful.

Also, along the outside of the museum was an area that displayed various planes, vehicles, and artillery used during Korean history.

This ship is an exact replica.  The real one is housed at a different site and unfortunately we weren’t able to see the inside, but it was still cool.

Then to get out of the rain we decided to check out the inside of the museum. There was so much information about Korea’s history as a whole, not just the Korean war that divided the peninsula in two.

One of the interesting, funny little things about Korean museums is that they seriously love using dioramas. Seriously, they love them.

The swords that Korean’s used to fight with were crazy big and scary.

awesome fighting details.

Pretty much hoping I can find one of these awesome outfits around Halloween.

huge boat replicas.

A flag that was signed by a volunteer corps during the war in the 1950s.

Tear drop made of dog tags from the Korean War. It was a really cool piece to see.

On the bottom floor there was a really cool exhibit we didn’t get to see but it was kiiind of like our version of gingerbread houses only they were made out of toothpicks and this puffed Korean cereal and rice cake things.  It was really neat.

I didn’t take many pictures in the museum because there was just soooo much to see, and I was really focused on reading what I could and just trying to keep all the things that have happened in the long history of this country separated. I totally recommend this as a place to see if you ever visit Seoul, just make sure you have a good chunk of time you can spend taking it all in.

 

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